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Old February 17th 08, 10:58 PM posted to alt.home.repair,misc.consumers.frugal-living,sci.energy
CJT CJT is offline
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Default How many therms (natural gas) do you use per day (per month)?

Rick Blaine wrote:
Tony Hwang wrote:


What is therm?



Approximately 105 megajoules. It's a common billing unit in the US.


Do they ever actually meter therms, or measure ccf and convert?
It seems to me to actually measure the therms, they'd need to
continuously monitor the heating value of the gas being delivered,
and that seems quite difficult compared with just measuring cf.
Of course, assuming they've stripped the gas down to nearly pure
methane, the conversion is easy, but natural gas can vary according
to ethane and higher content.

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Old February 17th 08, 11:21 PM posted to alt.home.repair,misc.consumers.frugal-living,sci.energy
Rick Blaine Rick Blaine is offline
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Default How many therms (natural gas) do you use per day (per month)?

CJT wrote:


Do they ever actually meter therms, or measure ccf and convert?
It seems to me to actually measure the therms, they'd need to
continuously monitor the heating value of the gas being delivered,
and that seems quite difficult compared with just measuring cf.
Of course, assuming they've stripped the gas down to nearly pure
methane, the conversion is easy, but natural gas can vary according
to ethane and higher content.



They do here... Meter reading is by CCF, then a conversion factor applied to get
therm, multiplied by the rate per therm. The factor changes slightly every
month...
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Old February 18th 08, 06:51 AM posted to alt.home.repair,misc.consumers.frugal-living,sci.energy
George Cornelius George Cornelius is offline
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Default How many therms (natural gas) do you use per day (per month)?

In article , Jeff writes:
Tony Hwang wrote:
What is therm? Here in Alberta measurement is by the Giga Joule.


At last! Someone using a rational energy unit.

By definition it is 100,000 BTU's. Blame the British and their Thermal
Units!


In fact, the BTU is one of the best of the British (actually now just
American) units. It's 1055 Joules, but as a rule of thumb you can think
of it as a kJ.

But having different units for every single energy source is just nuts.

Who else uses the therm, roughly .1 GJ, but the U.S. Gas industry?

www.oilnergy.com lists natural gas prices in MMBtu, where MM=1000*1000
or one million. That's pretty nice, just about the same thing as a GJ,
so we and the Canucks can actually think we are talking the same language.

[And MMBtu ~= MCF, so we have a three-way match]

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Old February 18th 08, 12:04 PM posted to alt.home.repair,misc.consumers.frugal-living,sci.energy
Jeff[_7_] Jeff[_7_] is offline
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Default How many therms (natural gas) do you use per day (per month)?

George Cornelius wrote:
In article , Jeff writes:
Tony Hwang wrote:
What is therm? Here in Alberta measurement is by the Giga Joule.


At last! Someone using a rational energy unit.

By definition it is 100,000 BTU's. Blame the British and their Thermal
Units!


In fact, the BTU is one of the best of the British (actually now just
American) units.


It's fairly useful for energy calculations when everything else is in
SAE, or whatever you call not metric. Insulation (in the US) is rated in
BTUs, square feet and degrees F. The amount of specific heat stored is 1
BTU per degree F per pound of water. Now if you mix in any metric, it
all becomes completely unwieldly. Either all metric or none at all makes
the most sense. I think we've had some rockets that smacked Mars because
of that.

Jeff


It's 1055 Joules, but as a rule of thumb you can think
of it as a kJ.

But having different units for every single energy source is just nuts.

Who else uses the therm, roughly .1 GJ, but the U.S. Gas industry?

www.oilnergy.com lists natural gas prices in MMBtu, where MM=1000*1000
or one million. That's pretty nice, just about the same thing as a GJ,
so we and the Canucks can actually think we are talking the same language.

[And MMBtu ~= MCF, so we have a three-way match]

--
George Cornelius cornelius ( A T ) eisner.decus.org



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Old February 18th 08, 03:45 PM posted to alt.home.repair,misc.consumers.frugal-living,sci.energy
George[_6_] George[_6_] is offline
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Default How many therms (natural gas) do you use per day (per month)?

On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 13:24:44 -0700, "Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer
Coordinator" wrote:

I'm curious how I compare with others in my natural gas usage.

I used 120 therms in the past 30 days (about 4 therms per day).
HOW MANY THERMS DID YOU USE LAST MONTH?

I do realize that there are _many_ factors that affect usage but there is
only one number for your final usage. That's what I'd like to compare.


Jan use: 220 therms (old masonry house, upstate NY)
Annual: 1450

In the winter, we pretty consistently run about 0.2 therms per
degree-day.

G
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Old February 18th 08, 05:34 PM posted to alt.home.repair,misc.consumers.frugal-living,sci.energy
Bill Ghrist Bill Ghrist is offline
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Default How many therms (natural gas) do you use per day (per month)?

Anthony Matonak wrote:
Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer Coordinator wrote:
I used 120 therms in the past 30 days (about 4 therms per day).
HOW MANY THERMS DID YOU USE LAST MONTH?

...
Does ANYONE actually use just 2 therms per day for their gas furnace and
hot-water heater for two people living in a small 1,500 sqft house?


I'm only one person but I average about 5 therms a month.
In the winter it's slightly more.

Anthony


Last year we used a total of 71.5 MCF (734 therms at 10.27 therm/MCF).
That's an average of 61.2 therms/month. Highest monthly usage was 17.4
MCF (178.7 therms) for 1/23/2007~2/22/2007 for which the average
temperature was 22 deg. F. Most recent monthly usage (33 days:
12/21/2007~1/24/2008) was 13.3 MCF (136.6 therms) with an average
temperature of 32 deg. F. In the summer months the usage was 1.2 MCF
(12.3 therms) per month.

This is a 1750 sq. foot, 53 year old brick and stone ranch style house
with fairly new double pane windows. We are in Pittsburgh, PA. Gas is
used for heating (forced air), hot water, and cooking, for two people.
We keep the thermostat at 58 degrees at night and 68 degrees in the
daytime in the winter.
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Old February 18th 08, 10:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair,misc.consumers.frugal-living,sci.energy
Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer Coordinator Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer Coordinator is offline
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Default How many therms (natural gas) do you use per day (per month)?

Wikipedia isn't bad on the use of "therms":
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_heater


For measurement units, it says:
Natural gas in the U.S. is measured in CCF (100 cubic feet), which is
converted to a standardized heat content unit called the therm, equal to
100,000 British thermal units. A BTU is the energy required to raise one
pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. A U.S. gallon of water weighs 8.3
pounds. So, to raise a 40-gallon tank of 55 °F water up to 105 °F would
require 40 x 8.3 x (105 − 55) / 100,000 BTU, or approximately 0.17 CCF, at
100% efficiency. A 40,000 BTU (per hour) heater would take 25 minutes to do
this, at 100% efficiency. At $1 per therm, the cost of the gas would be
about 17 cents.

As for usage ... it goes on to say:
Water enters residences in the US at about 10 °C (50 °F) (varies with
latitude and season). Adults generally prefer shower temperatures of 40–49
°C (105–120 °F), requiring the water temperature to be raised about 30 °C
(55 °F) or more, if the hot water is later mixed with cold water. The
Uniform Plumbing Code reference shower flow rate is 2.5 gpm (gallons per
minute); sink and dishwasher usages range from 1–3 gpm.
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Old February 20th 08, 01:41 AM posted to alt.home.repair,misc.consumers.frugal-living,sci.energy
Angelo Campanella Angelo Campanella is offline
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Default How many therms (natural gas) do you use per day (per month)?

Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer Coordinator wrote:
I used 120 therms in the past 30 days (about 4 therms per day).
HOW MANY THERMS DID YOU USE LAST MONTH?


ASSUMING that one therm equals 100 cubic feet (CCF) of (Ohio) gas, in
2001 just before we installed a high efficiency (sucks air and and blows
exahust via ground level tubes) we used (Columbia Gas here reads meters
only every other month, so I divided true reading deltas by two)

between 21 (summer) and 234 CCF (Winter).

The summer 8-20 CCF is ho****er plus gas dryer.
House is 1,500 square feet, with half-basement.
We are empty-nesters.

In summary:

2000: 20 - 188 CCF
2001: 21 - 234 CCF

In October, 2001, we insalled the Hi-eff ("90%") furnace, and then the
consumptions became:

2002: 8 to 136 CCF.
2003: --
2004: 9 - 150 CCF
2005: 12 - 153 CCF
2006: 11 - 157 CCF
2007: 9 - 164 CCF

rough summary:

Annually before, 1100 CCF/yr
Annually after, 850 CCF/yr

The stated effficiency of the old furnace was 60% (40% went up the
chimney). (120,000 BTU burner)
The new furnace is 90% (10% goes out the exhaust, and water condensate
trickles into my sump pump well). (90,000 BTU burner.

I should note that California alots only 2 therms a day for baseline costs
of about $1.22 per therm (plus 5 cents per therm PPP Surcharge); so
apparently I'm consuming double the natural gas energy California allows
(regardless of home size or number of people) for base rates.


We (me & wife) use just over two per day.

The over-baseline charges are $1.37 per therm plus that same 5 cents per
therm additional charge for poor people (i.e., the California Gas PPP
Surcharge).


Our rates are "all over the place".

Does ANYONE actually use just 2 therms per day for their gas furnace and
hot-water heater for two people living in a small 1,500 sqft house?


Sometimes. As our two boys were growing up, it was a bit crowded at
times. But we prevailed: They left the nest, and now here we are!


Angelo campanella



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