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Old January 26th 08, 11:54 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
David Wimberley David Wimberley is offline
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Posts: 1
Default Nasal Strips, Do-It-Yourself

I have used Breathe Right nasal strips with success, but they are
quite expensive. For awhile I was able to purchase less expensive
strips on eBay, but that source dried out. Eventually I decided to
try to make my own. I have been happy with the results.

Commercial nasal strips have an advantage over home made ones because
there is adhesive on the spring portion of the strip as well as on the
wings. The nasal strips that I make use a plastic spring and two
pieces of tape. There is no adhesive under the plastic spring. The
tape I use is the brand name Nexcare Durable Cloth in the 3/4" width.
This is made by 3M and goes by the hospital name of Durapore Surgical
Tape. It is described with the phrase "heavy-duty strong adhesive".
This is pretty effective stuff.

A number of sources could be used for the plastic spring. I have
found that the plastic designated PETE (recycling number 1) is
effective. I start out with a flat sheet that is the cover of a
container of salad greens. This is about 0.012 inches thick. I start
out with a rectangular piece of this material that is about 2 inches
long and 5/8 of an inch wide. I leave the center 3/8 of an inch or so
at the full width and taper the ends from both sides so that they come
to a blunt point that is about the thickness of a match (about 3/32")
across. This homemade spring is much more powerful than that used in
commercial nasal strips. Therefore it has to be bent so that it is
just a little more open than the contour of your nose. You just want
to be able to open the nasal passages enough to breathe easily. You
could probably get by with a narrow strip of this material that
wouldn't need to be bent. A narrow strip, however, will be inclined
to leave a depression on your nose as the commercial strips do.

Bend the strip around something like a small cylindrical pencil. It
is hard to do this perfectly but the bend doesn't really have to be
perfect.

I cut two pieces of tape about 0.8 inches long. I attach these across
the ends of the spring, overlapping the ends by about 3/32". I cut a
piece of paper towel to pad the center of the strip. The paper towel
should be just long enough to be held in place by the inner portions
of the two pieces of tape.

Applying the nasal strip your nose is about the same as it would be
with the commercial products. By the way, I have found that if I wash
my nose thoroughly with Dove soap the adhesive tape sticks adequately
but pimples are avoided.

Another approach that could be used by the frugal person would be to
reuse commercial strips by removing the flaps and applying the Nexcare
tape to the ends. Unfortunately, you will still run into the problem
that the adhesive under the spring will have lost its power.
Unfortunately, the tape will may a little residue on your nose that
will need to be removed after using the strip.

I just noticed that someone is selling, on eBay, instructions on
making your own nasal strips I do not know how his or her method
compares with mine.

Even if you don't want to make your own nasal strips, it is pretty
useful to have some of this Nexcare tape around to use for general
first aid purposes and to make do with a used commercial nasal strip
if you happen to run out.

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Old September 11th 13, 12:40 AM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
[email protected] drextarot@gmail.com is offline
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First recorded activity by BargainBanter: Sep 2013
Posts: 1
Default Nasal Strips, Do-It-Yourself

Couldn't you just apply another layer of tape on the underside of the spring?
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Old March 27th 14, 12:57 AM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
[email protected] morgant97@yahoo.com is offline
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First recorded activity by BargainBanter: Mar 2014
Posts: 1
Default Nasal Strips, Do-It-Yourself

On Saturday, 26 January 2008 15:54:51 UTC-8, David Wimberley wrote:
I have used Breathe Right nasal strips with success, but they are
quite expensive. For awhile I was able to purchase less expensive
strips on eBay, but that source dried out. Eventually I decided to
try to make my own. I have been happy with the results.

Commercial nasal strips have an advantage over home made ones because
there is adhesive on the spring portion of the strip as well as on the
wings. The nasal strips that I make use a plastic spring and two
pieces of tape. There is no adhesive under the plastic spring. The
tape I use is the brand name Nexcare Durable Cloth in the 3/4" width.
This is made by 3M and goes by the hospital name of Durapore Surgical
Tape. It is described with the phrase "heavy-duty strong adhesive".
This is pretty effective stuff.

A number of sources could be used for the plastic spring. I have
found that the plastic designated PETE (recycling number 1) is
effective. I start out with a flat sheet that is the cover of a
container of salad greens. This is about 0.012 inches thick. I start
out with a rectangular piece of this material that is about 2 inches
long and 5/8 of an inch wide. I leave the center 3/8 of an inch or so
at the full width and taper the ends from both sides so that they come
to a blunt point that is about the thickness of a match (about 3/32")
across. This homemade spring is much more powerful than that used in
commercial nasal strips. Therefore it has to be bent so that it is
just a little more open than the contour of your nose. You just want
to be able to open the nasal passages enough to breathe easily. You
could probably get by with a narrow strip of this material that
wouldn't need to be bent. A narrow strip, however, will be inclined
to leave a depression on your nose as the commercial strips do.

Bend the strip around something like a small cylindrical pencil. It
is hard to do this perfectly but the bend doesn't really have to be
perfect.

I cut two pieces of tape about 0.8 inches long. I attach these across
the ends of the spring, overlapping the ends by about 3/32". I cut a
piece of paper towel to pad the center of the strip. The paper towel
should be just long enough to be held in place by the inner portions
of the two pieces of tape.

Applying the nasal strip your nose is about the same as it would be
with the commercial products. By the way, I have found that if I wash
my nose thoroughly with Dove soap the adhesive tape sticks adequately
but pimples are avoided.

Another approach that could be used by the frugal person would be to
reuse commercial strips by removing the flaps and applying the Nexcare
tape to the ends. Unfortunately, you will still run into the problem
that the adhesive under the spring will have lost its power.
Unfortunately, the tape will may a little residue on your nose that
will need to be removed after using the strip.

I just noticed that someone is selling, on eBay, instructions on
making your own nasal strips I do not know how his or her method
compares with mine.

Even if you don't want to make your own nasal strips, it is pretty
useful to have some of this Nexcare tape around to use for general
first aid purposes and to make do with a used commercial nasal strip
if you happen to run out.


What is a substitution for the plastic thing? People use can tops like Pringles. Substitutions??
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Old June 10th 16, 05:28 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
[email protected] teaiceshift2@gmail.com is offline
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First recorded activity by BargainBanter: Jun 2016
Posts: 2
Default Nasal Strips, Do-It-Yourself

On Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at 8:57:55 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Saturday, 26 January 2008 15:54:51 UTC-8, David Wimberley wrote:
I have used Breathe Right nasal strips with success, but they are
quite expensive. For awhile I was able to purchase less expensive
strips on eBay, but that source dried out. Eventually I decided to
try to make my own. I have been happy with the results.

Commercial nasal strips have an advantage over home made ones because
there is adhesive on the spring portion of the strip as well as on the
wings. The nasal strips that I make use a plastic spring and two
pieces of tape. There is no adhesive under the plastic spring. The
tape I use is the brand name Nexcare Durable Cloth in the 3/4" width.
This is made by 3M and goes by the hospital name of Durapore Surgical
Tape. It is described with the phrase "heavy-duty strong adhesive".
This is pretty effective stuff.

A number of sources could be used for the plastic spring. I have
found that the plastic designated PETE (recycling number 1) is
effective. I start out with a flat sheet that is the cover of a
container of salad greens. This is about 0.012 inches thick. I start
out with a rectangular piece of this material that is about 2 inches
long and 5/8 of an inch wide. I leave the center 3/8 of an inch or so
at the full width and taper the ends from both sides so that they come
to a blunt point that is about the thickness of a match (about 3/32")
across. This homemade spring is much more powerful than that used in
commercial nasal strips. Therefore it has to be bent so that it is
just a little more open than the contour of your nose. You just want
to be able to open the nasal passages enough to breathe easily. You
could probably get by with a narrow strip of this material that
wouldn't need to be bent. A narrow strip, however, will be inclined
to leave a depression on your nose as the commercial strips do.

Bend the strip around something like a small cylindrical pencil. It
is hard to do this perfectly but the bend doesn't really have to be
perfect.

I cut two pieces of tape about 0.8 inches long. I attach these across
the ends of the spring, overlapping the ends by about 3/32". I cut a
piece of paper towel to pad the center of the strip. The paper towel
should be just long enough to be held in place by the inner portions
of the two pieces of tape.

Applying the nasal strip your nose is about the same as it would be
with the commercial products. By the way, I have found that if I wash
my nose thoroughly with Dove soap the adhesive tape sticks adequately
but pimples are avoided.

Another approach that could be used by the frugal person would be to
reuse commercial strips by removing the flaps and applying the Nexcare
tape to the ends. Unfortunately, you will still run into the problem
that the adhesive under the spring will have lost its power.
Unfortunately, the tape will may a little residue on your nose that
will need to be removed after using the strip.

I just noticed that someone is selling, on eBay, instructions on
making your own nasal strips I do not know how his or her method
compares with mine.

Even if you don't want to make your own nasal strips, it is pretty
useful to have some of this Nexcare tape around to use for general
first aid purposes and to make do with a used commercial nasal strip
if you happen to run out.


What is a substitution for the plastic thing? People use can tops like Pringles. Substitutions??


yes of course. medical grade tape is inexpensive, and very strong. make sure its double sided. Then experiment with whatever plastics you have.
the plastic gives the spring effect, which will open the nostrils.

i need a third nostril thou honestly. stupid allergies
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Old June 10th 16, 05:30 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
[email protected] teaiceshift2@gmail.com is offline
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First recorded activity by BargainBanter: Jun 2016
Posts: 2
Default Nasal Strips, Do-It-Yourself

On Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at 8:57:55 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Saturday, 26 January 2008 15:54:51 UTC-8, David Wimberley wrote:
I have used Breathe Right nasal strips with success, but they are
quite expensive. For awhile I was able to purchase less expensive
strips on eBay, but that source dried out. Eventually I decided to
try to make my own. I have been happy with the results.

Commercial nasal strips have an advantage over home made ones because
there is adhesive on the spring portion of the strip as well as on the
wings. The nasal strips that I make use a plastic spring and two
pieces of tape. There is no adhesive under the plastic spring. The
tape I use is the brand name Nexcare Durable Cloth in the 3/4" width.
This is made by 3M and goes by the hospital name of Durapore Surgical
Tape. It is described with the phrase "heavy-duty strong adhesive".
This is pretty effective stuff.

A number of sources could be used for the plastic spring. I have
found that the plastic designated PETE (recycling number 1) is
effective. I start out with a flat sheet that is the cover of a
container of salad greens. This is about 0.012 inches thick. I start
out with a rectangular piece of this material that is about 2 inches
long and 5/8 of an inch wide. I leave the center 3/8 of an inch or so
at the full width and taper the ends from both sides so that they come
to a blunt point that is about the thickness of a match (about 3/32")
across. This homemade spring is much more powerful than that used in
commercial nasal strips. Therefore it has to be bent so that it is
just a little more open than the contour of your nose. You just want
to be able to open the nasal passages enough to breathe easily. You
could probably get by with a narrow strip of this material that
wouldn't need to be bent. A narrow strip, however, will be inclined
to leave a depression on your nose as the commercial strips do.

Bend the strip around something like a small cylindrical pencil. It
is hard to do this perfectly but the bend doesn't really have to be
perfect.

I cut two pieces of tape about 0.8 inches long. I attach these across
the ends of the spring, overlapping the ends by about 3/32". I cut a
piece of paper towel to pad the center of the strip. The paper towel
should be just long enough to be held in place by the inner portions
of the two pieces of tape.

Applying the nasal strip your nose is about the same as it would be
with the commercial products. By the way, I have found that if I wash
my nose thoroughly with Dove soap the adhesive tape sticks adequately
but pimples are avoided.

Another approach that could be used by the frugal person would be to
reuse commercial strips by removing the flaps and applying the Nexcare
tape to the ends. Unfortunately, you will still run into the problem
that the adhesive under the spring will have lost its power.
Unfortunately, the tape will may a little residue on your nose that
will need to be removed after using the strip.

I just noticed that someone is selling, on eBay, instructions on
making your own nasal strips I do not know how his or her method
compares with mine.

Even if you don't want to make your own nasal strips, it is pretty
useful to have some of this Nexcare tape around to use for general
first aid purposes and to make do with a used commercial nasal strip
if you happen to run out.


What is a substitution for the plastic thing? People use can tops like Pringles. Substitutions??


he only said in article "A number of sources could be used for the plastic spring.

you must experiment, i kno credit cards work sort of, try cutting from whatever plastics you have at home.


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